Euromillions winner statistics

Euromillions statistics

How to Identify a EuroMillions Lottery Scam

  • It is not possible to win a EuroMillions prize, raffle, sweepstake or competition that you have not entered. If you receive a notification informing you that you have won a prize in a game you have never played, it is a scam.
  • To win a EuroMillions prize, you must have purchased a ticket for the correct draw date and your number selection must match the balls required to win the relevant prize.
  • You do not win EuroMillions prizes based on randomly selected mobile phone numbers or email addresses, including for games which you did not enter.
  • EuroMillions will not ask you to pay any type of ‘fee’ to receive your prize.
  • EuroMillions will not ask you to pay the ‘tax’ due on the win in advance of receiving a prize.

Clues to Identify a Scam

All of the points listed below are usually a good indication that the winning notification you have received is a scam:

  • The email has been sent from a free webmail address (for example @hotmail.com, @outlook.com or @yahoo.com) or from an unrelated address that could have been compromised.
  • The letter or email does not address you personally but instead starts with something vague like ‘Dear Winner’. This may not always be the case, however, so don’t assume the message is genuine just because it uses your name.
  • Scam letters are often on poor quality, photocopied letterhead (although some will include a genuine business address in an attempt to provide legitimacy). It is worth noting that not all scam letters are of a low quality; scammers are constantly updating and improving technology so their messages may appear more legitimate.
  • There is often a strict time limit to claim the ‘prize’. This is intended to put the potential victim under pressure and deter them from seeking advice or investigating the matter further.
  • Confidentiality is often demanded as a ‘condition of winning’. Again, this is to deter the recipient from seeking the advice of friends or family who may be more familiar with this type of scam.
  • The communication may contain complicated language and jargon, such as ticket numbers and ‘batch’ references in an attempt to give the document an ‘official’ feel.
  • Poor spelling, grammar and syntax are usually a good indication that the letter or email is a scam.
  • A photocopy of a cheque with your name on it may be contained within the communication to entice you into sending funds, something which real lotteries would never do.
  • Some scams may claim to be from Euro-Millions.com, but please remember that we will never contact you under any circumstances to say you have won a prize. Any prize notifications that supposedly originate from Euro-Millions.com are fraudulent.

Why Prizes Differ Between Currencies

The Euro is the base currency for EuroMillions as it is used by seven of the nine participating countries. When a jackpot is won in the UK the equivalent figure in pounds is paid out, based on the exchange rate on the day of the draw.

For non-jackpot prizes, the amount you receive in the UK is not worked out purely on the basis of the exchange rate. Instead, a formula is in place to take into account each country’s contribution to the game.

Each country that participates in EuroMillions contributes €1.10 into the Common Prize Fund, which is used to pay out prizes to all winners. Camelot’s contribution to the Common Prize Fund is the 50% of £1.74 from every EuroMillions ticket sold.

If, using the exchange rates on the day of a draw, Camelot’s contribution to the Common Prize Fund works out at less than €1.10, prizes paid out to UK players will be reduced to compensate for the shortfall. If, on the other hand, Camelot’s contribution amounts to more than €1.10, UK winners will receive comparatively bigger prizes than winners in other countries.

To put it simply, if £1.74 is worth less than €2.20, UK winners will receive smaller prizes than those in other countries. If £1.74 is worth more than €2.20, UK players will receive more. These rules ensure that prizes are always in line with how much each participating country contributes to the Common Prize Fund.

Playing EuroMillions Around the World

EuroMillions is a lottery that can be played and enjoyed all around the world. Thanks to lottery concierge services like theLotter and lottery betting sites such as Jackpot.com, players from across the globe can regularly take part in EuroMillions draws.

The two systems of play allow you to win the same EuroMillions prizes, but the way in which they work differ slightly. While a lottery concierge service sees a representative purchase a ticket on your behalf, Lotto betting allows you to place a wager on the outcome of a draw. You will receive exactly the same amount of money as those playing with a physical ticket and the odds of winning remain exactly the same.

Details of how to take part in EuroMillions draws using both methods are listed below:

To play via a lottery concierge service:

  • Register an online account. This process is safe and secure.
  • Select your numbers (five from 1 to 50 and two Lucky Stars from a separate pool of 1 to 12).
  • Confirm your selection and pay for your entry.
  • A lottery representative will purchase a ticket on your behalf and save a copy of your entry in your online account.
  • Once the draw has been made, any winnings will be transferred directly into your online account.

To play via a lottery betting site:

  • Register an online account. This process is safe and secure.
  • Select your numbers (five from 1 to 50 and two Lucky Stars from a separate pool of 1 to 12).
  • Confirm your selection and pay for your entry.
  • You will receive confirmation of your bet via email.
  • Once the draw has been made, you will receive an email detailing any prizes you have won. Any winnings will be transferred to your online account.

November 2009 – Changes to EuroMillions Format

On 7th November 2009, EuroMillions’ 11-rollover limit was replaced by a jackpot cap of €185 million. In the event of the jackpot reaching €185 million, it would remain there for one additional draw before being rolled down to winners in the next prize tier. Additionally, the jackpot cap would be increased by €5 million once reached.

The price of a EuroMillions ticket also increased from £1.50 to £2. The price increase heralded the launch of a new supplementary raffle game, ‘Millionaire Raffle’, on 13th November. Included in the EuroMillions ticket’s new price, UK players would get the chance to win a guaranteed €1 million every week by matching the raffle code printed on their ticket with the code revealed during a EuroMillions draw.

Changes Summary

  • Rollover cap replaced by €185 million jackpot cap, increased by €5 million each time it is reached
  • New supplementary ‘Millionaire Raffle’ introduced in the UK
  • Ticket price increased from £1.50 to £2.
Оцените статью